Picturing the Past
 
Teacher Section
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Activity, printable version


Short Answer Questions


Curriculum Links

Although each provincial curriculum is different, links have been provided when appropriate to the established goals and themes for classrooms across Canada, as of 2006.


Atlantic Canada


This website can be used to enhance Atlantic Canadian Social Studies and Language Arts Curricula outcomes in a variety of ways:


Social Studies


Based on the suggested framework for Atlantic Canadian Social Studies outlined in the document “Foundation for the Atlantic Canada Social Studies Curriculum”, this site can be integrated into the following outcomes:


  • Time
  • Continuity and Change
  • Interdependence
  • People, Place and Environment


The site also contains geographic information, including a map of Canada. It demonstrates how events far away have an impact on Canadian society. The site is designed to aide students in learning how to understand, study and describe the past in a meaningful way. It is focused on the human element of the Second World War, and uses the voices of children to help students identify with the subject.



Language Arts


This site and the following lesson plans will help students reach some of the key objectives communicated in the curriculum document “Atlantic Canada Language Arts Curriculum Elementary 4-6.” The following lesson plans integrate key elements of this document:


  • A focus on group work and discussion
  • learning how to follow simple directions
  • detecting examples of stereotyping and prejudice


The site is set up as a work of historical fiction dealing with Canada and Britain during the Second World War. Below, a selection of short-answer questions can be printed and handed out for each section of the site. It is interactive and allows children to hear text as they read it.


Quebec


Social Studies


This site focuses on Canada between 1939 and 1945, and provides an outside perspective on Canadian society during this time period. The site is designed to aide students in learning how to understand, study and describe the past in a meaningful way. It is focused on the human element of the Second World War, and uses the voices of children to help students identify with the subject. The site has some geographic information, including a map of Canada. It also demonstrates how events far away have an impact on Canadian society.


In this section students learn key concepts such as:


  • Interpreting change in society
  • Being open to diversity


They will also acquire skills such as:


  • Map reading
  • Timelines creation
  • Historical study and research


Language Arts


The Language Arts program for Quebec focuses on specific skills: reading, oral expression, comprehension and interpretation. The stories found on this site complement these skills by providing students with a chance to read and understand while they engage in a multimedia experience. This site will help students understand how to take meaningful information from historical fiction. The lessons below provide an opportunity for group work, written and oral presentations, and outside research. Students have the option to either read along with the spoken text or to read the story without the sound. Each vignette is also an example of interactive dialogue; the animation provides both verbal and non-verbal cues to aide student understanding of language.


Ontario


Social Studies


The site is designed to help students understand, study and describe the past in a meaningful way. It is focused on the human element of the Second World War, and uses the voices of children to help students identify with the subject. Links to the curriculum of Ontario are located in the Canada and World Connections strand of Elementary Social Studies. This site will help students understand the geography of Canada, the political divisions of the provinces and some of the major cities. The site will allow students to understand that Canada is affected by world events. Students will also see the historic relationship between Canada and the United Kingdom, outside of the traditional explorers and colony relationships of earlier centuries. Lesson eight will also pick up on the Ontario curriculum’s focus on Aboriginal contributions to Canadian society, with a lesson plan built around Native veterans.


Language Arts


The site is set up as a work of historical fiction dealing with Canada and Britain during the Second World War. Below, a selection of short-answer questions can be printed and handed out for each section of the site. It is interactive, and allows children to hear the words as they read them. The lessons provide an opportunity for group work, written and oral presentations, and outside research. Students have the option to either read along with the spoken words or to read the story without the sound. Each vignette is an example of interactive dialogue; the animation provides both verbal and non-verbal cues to aide student understanding of language.


Manitoba


Social Studies


This site fits very well with the Manitoba elementary school curriculum set out for grade 6. Vignettes specifically deal with the “changing role of women” in Canada, identify contributions by Native peoples to Canadian society, in the form of volunteering for military service, describe Canada’s contributions to the Second World War, and help students appreciate the sacrifice made by Canadian soldiers. Specifically, in the cluster entitled “An Emerging Nation (1914-1945)”, this site meets the requirement that students read stories depicting the life and times of people during the Second World War.


Language Arts


The site is set up as a work of historical fiction dealing with Canada and Britain during the Second World War. Below, a selection of short-answer questions can be printed and handed out for each section of the site. It is interactive and allows children to hear the words as they read them. The lessons provide an opportunity for group work, written and oral presentations, and outside research. Students have the option to either read along with the spoken words or to read the story without the sound. Each vignette is an example of interactive dialogue; the animation provides both verbal and non-verbal cues to aide student understanding of language.


Saskatchewan


Social Studies


The Grade 6 Social Studies Curriculum for the province is entitled “Canada and its Atlantic Neighbours.” This site fits in well with the goals and needs of this grade level. Students will see, through working with this site, that Canada is affected by world events. Specifically, they will learn about the Second World War and the relationship Canada had with Great Britain at that time. Students at this grade level are expected to understand how to organize information, and lesson plans provided allow for group work, essay-type projects, and discussion that will aide them in acquiring this skill. They will have the chance to create oral, written and visual displays, and to learn how to work with multimedia and computer resources. The site can help teachers convey the concepts of map-reading and group identity, as well as aide students in understanding what a primary source is used for and what an artefact is.


Language Arts


This site will help students understand how to take meaningful information from historical fiction. The lessons below provide an opportunity for group work, written and oral presentations, and outside research. Students have the option to either read along with the spoken words or to read the story without the sound. Each vignette is an example of interactive dialogue; the animation provides both verbal and non-verbal cues to aide student understanding of language.


Alberta


Social Studies


The Alberta elementary curriculum for Social Studies in grade 5 focuses on Canada: Its Geography and People. This site fits with the goal of helping students explore what activities people across the country were engaged in, and how they related to their environment. Students are also expected to understand Canada’s historic relationship with other countries, and this site will introduce Great Britain. The site contains some geographic information, including a map of Canada. It also demonstrates how events far away have an impact on Canadian society. The site is designed to help students understand, study and describe the past in a meaningful way. It is focused on the human element of the Second World War, and uses the voices of children to help students identify with the subject.


Language Arts


Students at this level are expected to be able to write several short well-constructed paragraphs, collect and organize information, and develop group-work skills. This site will help students understand how to take meaningful information from historical fiction. The lessons below provide an opportunity for group work, written and oral presentations, and outside research. Students have the option to either read along with the spoken words or to read the story without the sound. Each vignette is an example of interactive dialogue; the animation provides both verbal and non-verbal cues to aide student understanding of language.


British Columbia


Social Studies


Students in grades 4 to 6 in the province of British Columbia are expected to develop certain skills: problem-solving, research, analysis of source materials and the ability to develop coherent presentations. This site and the lessons plans provided allow students to develop all of these skills while learning about Canada’s relationship with Great Britain during the Second World War. The site contains some geographic information, including a map of Canada. It also demonstrates how events far away have an impact on Canadian society. The site is designed to help students understand, study and describe the past in a meaningful way. It is focused on the human element of the Second World War, and uses the voices of children to help students identify with the subject.


Language Arts


Students at this level are expected to be able to write several short well-constructed paragraphs, collect and organize information, and develop group-work skills. This site will help students understand how to take meaningful information from historical fiction. The lessons below provide an opportunity for group work, written and oral presentations, and outside research. Students have the option to either read along with the spoken words or to read the story without the sound. Each vignette is an example of interactive dialogue; the animation provides both verbal and non-verbal cues to aide student understanding of language.



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